Big House, Small Yard vs. Small House, Big Yard

When you are buying a home, there are two general combinations that each provide different benefits to you, the buyer—would you rather have a big house and a small yard, or a small house with a big yard?

Buying a home? Click here to perform a full home search
Selling your home? Click here for a FREE Home Price Evaluation 

Call me at 303-974-9471 for a FREE home buying or selling consultation to answer any of your real estate questions.

Should you buy a big house with a smaller yard or a smaller house with a big yard? Today I will discuss the pros and cons of each scenario.

Big House/Small Yard:

With this combination, you’ll have a lot of entertainment space inside. Additionally, large families tend to buy larger homes, since they’ll inevitably have more bedrooms. Other options include an in-home theater, a library, a game room, a rooftop deck, or a multi-car garage.

The cons of this arrangement must be considered as well. With a larger house, you will undoubtedly have a larger utility bill, as well as more to clean. And, of course, you will not have much space in your yard.
Think through whether you and your family will benefit from more inside space or more outside space.
Small House/Big Yard:

If you are an outdoor person, this is a great combination. You have a lot of area to walk, think, entertain, and add certain features, like a pool, clubhouse, greenhouse, or a guest house. What is more is that all that outside space lends you quite a bit of privacy. You will not have as much to clean, and likely the utility cost will be lower.

There are drawbacks here as well. Naturally, this combo will require a large amount of landscaping to maintain—sprinklers, fences, trimming, mulching, and so on—but perhaps that is something you enjoy doing. On the inside, you will have less to maintain, but also less room to spread out or entertain with.

When you are thinking about purchasing a home, think through these pros and cons; decide whether you and your family will benefit from more inside space or more outside space. Also consider the neighborhood you would like to live in, as that will affect what is available to you.

The Anderson Group is good at helping you find the best fit for you and your family, so if you need any help finding a home to suit your needs, please reach out to us. We are here to make your life better because of real estate.

How to Avoid Costly Damages Caused by Poor Drainage

Cracks in your foundation from poor drainage cause damage which is costly to repair. Here is how you can avoid that becoming an issue.

Buying a home? Click here to perform a full home search
Selling your home? Click here for a FREE Home Price Evaluation 

Call me at 303-974-9471 for a FREE home buying or selling consultation to answer any of your real estate questions.

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve come to a house where water has damaged the foundational walls, causing them to crack. This major home issue is caused by poor drainage.

One of the easiest ways that you can protect your house is to make sure that your drainage is coming down the downspouts, away from the house. Some people have landscapes that grade toward the home—this should be corrected immediately because melted snow and rainwater will be funneled toward your concrete foundation wall. Over time, this will erode and deteriorate it. That will eventually cause so much pressure on the wall that it cracks; once that happens, you’ll immediately lose $50,000 or more in value, since you’ve now got a structural problem that must be addressed.
One of the easiest ways that you can protect your house is to make sure that your drainage is coming down the downspouts, away from the house.
If you try to sell that house, the crack won’t go anywhere. You can cover it up with a band-aid or try to reinforce it, but it will be super difficult to overcome that flaw. Buyers won’t feel safe knowing that it could get worse over time or that they’ll have to pay to fix it if they purchase the house.

My advice to you is that if you have any sort of drainage running into your foundation, re-landscape it so that it flows away from your home. You’ll thank me for this because fixing a foundational crack is immensely costly.

If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to us. We’d be glad to guide and advise you however we can.

8 Home Repairs You Shouldn't Avoid, Pt. 8: Peeling Paint

Peeling paint seems like a minor issue, but it can expand into much larger and more expensive problems.

Buying a home? Click here to perform a full home search
Selling your home? Click here for a FREE Home Price Evaluation 

Call me at 303-974-9471 for a FREE home buying or selling consultation to answer any of your real estate questions.


For today’s eighth and final installment in my series on home repairs that you should not avoid, I want to discuss peeling paint.

If you have paint that you have not touched up in a long time, it will begin to peel. As it peels, water will seep into the wood, causing it to deteriorate. With each new problem, the expenses will grow exponentially.

Paint will typically begin to peel in areas of the house that are most exposed to the sun. Check those areas of your home first and scrape off the peeling paint, touch it up, or apply a fresh coat altogether. It is a relatively inexpensive gesture that could end up saving you thousands of dollars in the long-run, especially if you plan to sell the home or end up having to replace any damaged wood.
Paint will typically begin to peel in areas of the house that are most exposed to the sun.
I recommend having the paint refreshed every other year, just to ensure that the minor problems are taken care of before they escalate into bigger headaches.

If you have any questions or need referrals to painters or handymen, please feel free to reach out to me. I would be glad to help.

The 7th Repair to Not Avoid: Water Leaks

You want to avoid unexpected, costly repairs in your home’s future, correct? It is possible if you fix water leaks before they become a larger issue.

Buying a home? Click here to perform a full home search
Selling your home? Click here for a FREE Home Price Evaluation 

Call me at 303-974-9471 for a FREE home buying or selling consultation to answer any of your real estate questions.


Today I’m continuing my series on repairs that you should not avoid. For this installment, we’ll be talking about water leaks.

Water leaks may not seem like a big deal, but that small drip under your bathroom sink or in your basement can turn into something much larger. The issues get worse, rather than better. If you know there is a leak anywhere in your house, get it taken care of immediately.

The funny thing about leaks is that you cannot always tell where they are. I saw a leak in my garage but there is nothing over my garage, so I knew it could not have come from above. It came from 30 feet away in our master bathroom’s tub which had a crack in it near the drain. When it was full, the water seeped through and down the line into my garage. It would have been near impossible to know where the water was coming without speaking to a plumber who was, luckily, able to discover the source.

So, take a look at your leaks so they do not affect your electrical system, damage your drywall, or result in unexpected, costly repairs. Have a plumber come out on a yearly basis and get leaks repaired immediately to avoid the potential damages.
Look at your leaks so they do not affect your electrical system, damage your drywall, or result in unexpected, costly repairs.
If you have any questions about this or anything else real estate related, please feel free to contact me by phone or email. I look forward to speaking with you soon.

As Seen On...

As Seen On...